Okay, we all know the world was supposed to end today. Thankfully, it did not - I have a huge install on Saturday and I would really NOT like leaving a project incomplete (insert smiley face here). Of course, I jest. The world is still here and we're all plugging along. All this talk of the coming apocalypse got me thinking about the nuclear bomb shelters so popular in the 1950s and 1960s. Whenever we see pictures of a bomb shelter, it's a big gray box made out of concrete. Concrete, however, is one of the few building materials that can be formed, molded, shaped, colored, textured, transformed, etc. If you start really looking through high end design magazines, you start to see concrete everywhere. Interior designers love the flexibility this particular material allows. In putting together this short article, I wanted to find a range of examples in which concrete is used to it's fullest capability. You'll see concrete in both modern and classical setting. You'll see it in a rigid shape and in what looks like it's in mid-flow. The flexibility allows interior designers and architects to be as creative as they want. Let's call this an "Ode to Fly Ash."

Portland interior designers talk about use of concrete in traditional space

concrete sink used in contemporary bathroom design

industrial use of concrete in interior design of dining room

concrete fireplace surround with dark wood details

interior designers, Portland, Oregon talk about use of concrete in interior design

concrete wall used as focal wall in bathroom design

 

Stop by the Concreteworks website to see concrete used in even more ways - tiles, counters, integrated sinks, outdoor spaces. It's inspiring. I hope you're inspired to consider concrete in your next project.

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